How to Breed Livebearers

 

Livebearers

Livebearers

Majority of people may be astonished upon learning that there are commonly kept aquarium fishes that give birth to living young instead of laying eggs. Giving live birth is usually associated with mammals and the fact that some fish have develop this method, they are as well considered to have mammalian traits. The truth is, many vertebrate animals give birth to living young. These fish are called livebearers. Among other aquarium fishes only one livebearing family is well represented, the Poeciliidae. Together with this family belong the less well-known Limias, and Guppies, Swordtails and Platies, Gambusia and Mosquito Fish (Heterandria). There are several other Poeciliidi, but are rarely found in aquarium shops because those that are available are characterised by so many color varieties that fill the market.

The benefit to an animal that reproduces by giving live birth instead of laying eggs is so obvious. Because the offspring is already well-developed and self-sufficient in ability to feed and move away from any danger or threats. The new generation's survival is somewhat
less unsafe that it is for an egg or vulnerable larvae. The parent need not produce as many young to insure survival for its kind and in return the parent animal doesn’t need to expend as much energy and food material in producing many eggs or in building nests and caring
for the eggs and powerless young which hatch from them. This energy and food can be used by the parent for its own needs to survive with only less effort than if were obliged to cast a larger amount of its substance as an egg-laying animal. Of course livebearing animals, including fish don't know all this and have not chosen livebearing over egg-laying as a more inexpensive method of reproduction, but the advantages are present nonetheless. That
many unrelated animals reproduce in this general way attests to its effectiveness. While egg-laying fishes typically produce hundreds or thousands of eggs each spawning, livebearing fishes only generate few dozen young at a time.

Keeping the eggs in the female body until the young are well developed and able to swim directly after they are born reduces the number of eggs necessary to replace the parent generation.

 
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